How To Avoid Hitting A Deer



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It seems like so many of our friends and relatives have either hit a deer, or just had a number of near-misses.

I read some articles recently about how to avoid hitting a deer, and how to minimize the damage to your vehicle if you do.

In addition to installing deer whistles on our vehicles, here’s what I’ve learned about vehicle-deer collisions and how to avoid hitting a deer…

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there are about 1 million car accidents with deer each year that kill 200 Americans, cause more than 10,000 personal injuries, and result in $1 billion in vehicle damage.

USAToday

Best Tips For Avoiding Deer

Deer crossing sign.
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#1 “If an encounter with a deer is inevitable, then you should hit the brakes up until the very last second of impact; suddenly releasing the brakes will send the deer propelling into the roadway rather than into your windshield.” — The Tennessean

#2 – “Don’t swerve. If a collision seems inevitable, don’t veer off to avoid the animal. Your risk of injury may be greater if you do. Maintain control of the vehicle.” — State Farm

#3 – “If you spot a deer in the road, slow down immediately and blow your horn with one long blast to frighten it away.” — Wisconsin Dept. of Transportation

#4  “Most motorist deaths and injuries occur when drivers swerve to avoid hitting the deer and strike a fixed object, such as a tree or another vehicle. It may seem powerless, but simply applying your brakes while you’re buckled up, gripping the steering wheel with both hands, and coming to a controlled stop (if possible) can actually help minimize damage and injuries.” — The Auto Channel

#5 – “Be especially attentive from sunset to midnight and during the hours shortly before and after sunrise. These are the highest risk times for deer-vehicle collisions.” — Insurance Information Institute

#6 – “Don’t assume there’s only one deer crossing the road — they usually travel in groups.” — The Charlotte Observer

#7  “When you encounter deer along the roadside, turn on your emergency lights to let other motorists know about the potential danger.” U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service

More great tips, specifically for motorcycle riders: How to Avoid Deer and Other Animals on a Motorcycle.

deer crossing sign
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Some Interesting Facts:

For the 5th year in a row, West Virginia tops the list of states where a driver is most likely to run into a deer, State Farm reports. The other states in the top 10 are Iowa, South Dakota, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Montana, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota and Wyoming. –

USAToday

Check out the complete list of states with the highest deer-car collision rates, as well as the states where you’re most likely to hit a deer.

A Word About Deer Whistles

Unfortunately, car deer whistles may be less effective than originally thought.

Still, in my opinion, anything that could even possibly help avoid a deer collision makes sense.

Even if it reduces your chances of hitting a deer 90% as reported by the Save A Deer brand of car whistles, it’s worth it. Especially since the deer whistles are so cheap!

Funny Deer Stuff

Check out this video of 3 deer “boxing” in the wild:

Another video of a dog and deer playing:

If you like hunting, then you’ll love these free online deer hunting games!

Listen to Bud Light’s Real Men of Genius ”Mr. Camouflage Suit Maker”:

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Lynnette

As a lifelong traveler, I like to help people find unique ways to do things that will save time & money -- so I write about "outside the box" Travel Hacks that most wouldn't think of. I'm SUPER organized and I love to pack! I've lived in 6 different states (Florida, Indiana, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, and Texas) and have visited every other state in the U.S. -- except Hawaii. (Can you say bucket list?) I've been on several different cruises, airplanes, and boats in my life and I currently enjoy the outdoors by bicycling, motorcycling, Jeeping, RVing, camping, or just walking my dogs. My favorite "hobby" is riding on the back of our Harley-Davidson Road Glide traveling cross country -- which we usually do at least once each year. We even rode from Tennessee to Alaska once! When I'm not on the road, you will find me at the corner of Good News & Fun Times as publisher of The Fun Times Guide (32 fun & helpful websites).

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